Child killer Colin Pitchfork roams free after 33 years yards from school pupils

Killer Colin Pitchfork is seen roaming free after 33 years just yards from school pupils.

Pitchfork was seen in a grey t-shirt and flat-cap as he wandered down the street from his bail hostel.

A source said: “Just the thought of Pitchfork walking among children is terrifying.”

Rebecca Eastwood, whose sister Lynda Mann was his first victim, told the Sun : “Why has he been placed near a number of schools?

“I just hope the pictures will mean people will now be able to be on their guard.”

Pitchfork strangled Lynda Mann, 15, while his baby son slept in his car, before doing the same to schoolgirl Dawn Ashworth three years later.

Despite never showing remorse, the 61-year-old was last week freed from his life sentence by parole chiefs.

He now lives in a probation hostel at an undisclosed site.

Speaking for the first time in more than five years, Rebecca Eastwood, 40, said: “No one is truly safe.”

She said: “He could be living on your street or near your school. I believe he will kill again.”

Rebecca hopes parole chiefs did not make a mistake in freeing him, adding “they can’t be 100% certain it is safe”.

Pitchfork killed Lynda after seeing her on a footpath near her home in Narborough, Leics, in November 1983.

Three years later he murdered Dawn, 15, on another stretch of the path. Pitchfork was the first person to be snared by DNA evidence and got 28 years in jail after an appeal.

Three years later he murdered Dawn, 15, on another stretch of the path.

Pitchfork was the first person to be snared by DNA evidence and got 28 years in jail after an appeal.

The former baker, now known as David Thorpe, was given the green light for release in June from HMP Leyhill in Gloucestershire, sparking fury.

Rebecca, who lives in Liverpool, said it left her “numb”.

She said: “It’s terrifying to think he could be nearby.”

Pitchfork, who was also a flasher, must stick to 40 licence terms – but Rebecca believes he could never be rehabilitated.

She said: “If you’re as predatory as he is, you can’t just switch that off.”

Her main concern is the welfare of her eight year-old daughter “because of what happened to Lynda”.

Pitchfork looked set to avoid the sex offender register until the Sunday Mirror exposed a loophole.

Now Rebecca wants to see the parole system overhauled, branding it “too secretive”.

She said: “Victims’ families should be front and centre of any parole hearing.

“The only justice I hoped for was that Pitchfork would take his last breath behind bars.

“I don’t feel the justice system has protected us.

“From this day on, I will always be looking behind me.”